Launching sailboat Atom

The past week I had the opportunity to help James Baldwin to launch his Pearson Triton “Atom”, a 28 ft sailboat that James took around the globe twice. Atom got back in the water after an extensive refit. The Columbia 29 and the Pearson Triton are very similar designs, so Atom it’s a an ideal example to see how to fit Tranquility as an offshore cruising yacht. James and Mei made an excellent job with this refit and Atom looks better than ever. The northerly wind offered perfect sailing conditions in the Marshes of Glynn and we made it safely to the dock enjoying the day on the water.

14 thoughts on “Launching sailboat Atom”

  1. As a fellow Columbia 29 owner and enthusiast, I look forward to seeing the photos of how you refit your boat. I am especially curious about how you might reinforce the mast step as mine is in need of rebuilding. I am actually thinking now of cutting the whole thing out and putting in a new arched frame that will be bolted to the bulkheads on either side and the re-glassed on the deck. Post lots of photos, thanks!

  2. As a fellow Columbia 29 owner and enthusiast, I look forward to seeing the photos of how you refit your boat. I am especially curious about how you might reinforce the mast step as mine is in need of rebuilding. I am actually thinking now of cutting the whole thing out and putting in a new arched frame that will be bolted to the bulkheads on either side and the re-glassed on the deck. Post lots of photos, thanks!

  3. oops! I just reviewed your posts and see where you rebuilt the compression post. So you have the later interior and you have done that work already!

  4. oops! I just reviewed your posts and see where you rebuilt the compression post. So you have the later interior and you have done that work already!

  5. Yes you see the job I did in that post.The compression post itself was solid, I needed to step it on the bilge.

    On deck I am thinking about to add a fiberglass plate, 1/2inch thick as an additional foot between the deck and the mast. But for that I have to way for the next haul-out.

    I will start again with boat projects soon and I will post my progress.

    1. Hi Fabio. I just read your comment about wanting to build a fiberglass plate to reinforce the deck where your mast is stepped. I did something like that with my Triton. It originally had a round wooden disk with a square notch cut in the center to accept the protrusion on the base of the mast. I cast something of similar shape, about an inch thick, from epoxy and layers of heavy roving, using a round plastic container as a mold. The edges of the square hole are reinforced with pieces of angle-aluminum cast in place. I can send pictures if you like. Good luck in your travels. Bill

      1. Hi Bill, thanks for your comment. The procedure you describe sounds much about what I am thinking to do for Tranquility. Years ago, one of the previous owners changed the rig to a cutter and the mast was moved forward by 6 inches. They did the job according to the designer specs but they didn’t bother to support the mast in the new position.
        I am going for a rectangular shaped plate of roughly 16×12 inches to give a wide foot and to fix the dip in the deck. I would love to see some of your pictures. I am sending you an email. Best.

  6. Yes you see the job I did in that post.The compression post itself was solid, I needed to step it on the bilge.

    On deck I am thinking about to add a fiberglass plate, 1/2inch thick as an additional foot between the deck and the mast. But for that I have to way for the next haul-out.

    I will start again with boat projects soon and I will post my progress.

    1. Hi Fabio. I just read your comment about wanting to build a fiberglass plate to reinforce the deck where your mast is stepped. I did something like that with my Triton. It originally had a round wooden disk with a square notch cut in the center to accept the protrusion on the base of the mast. I cast something of similar shape, about an inch thick, from epoxy and layers of heavy roving, using a round plastic container as a mold. The edges of the square hole are reinforced with pieces of angle-aluminum cast in place. I can send pictures if you like. Good luck in your travels. Bill

      1. Hi Bill, thanks for your comment. The procedure you describe sounds much about what I am thinking to do for Tranquility. Years ago, one of the previous owners changed the rig to a cutter and the mast was moved forward by 6 inches. They did the job according to the designer specs but they didn’t bother to support the mast in the new position.
        I am going for a rectangular shaped plate of roughly 16×12 inches to give a wide foot and to fix the dip in the deck. I would love to see some of your pictures. I am sending you an email. Best.

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